Arthur Cutler Named New Director at Open Arms Housing

The Board of Directors of Open Arms Housing announced that Arthur Cutler has been hired as the organization’s new executive director. As of February 25, Arthur Cutler will replace Marilyn Kresky-Wolff as Open Arms Housing Executive Director.

Marilyn Kresky-Wolff is Open Arms Housing’s first and only Executive Director, who has served in that capacity since 2009. Kresky-Wolff’s last day at Open Arms is March 15 to allow for some overlap between the two directors.


The Board of Directors of Open Arms Housing announced that Arthur Cutler has been hired as the organization’s new executive director. As of February 25, Arthur Cutler will replace Marilyn Kresky-Wolff as Open Arms Housing Executive Director.

Marilyn Kresky-Wolff is Open Arms Housing’s first and only Executive Director, who has served in that capacity since 2009. Kresky-Wolff’s last day at Open Arms is March 15 to allow for some overlap between the two directors.

Cutler comes to Open Arms from Fair Chance in Washington, DC where he has been the Chief Operating Officer since 2014. In that position, he was responsible for providing leadership, planning, management, and enhancement of Fair Chance’s internal organization systems and infrastructure. Cutler supervised a $1.9 million budget and directed day-to-day operations including financial planning, human resources, and
technology systems. 

Prior to his position at Fair Chance, Cutler held supervisory posts at a variety of DC-based organizations including the Excelsior Consulting Group, the National Disability Rights Network, the Alliance for Nonprofit Management, and the National Crime Prevention Council. He received a Juris Doctor from the Michigan State University College of Law and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Morehouse College.

Cutler was named by the Aspen Institute and American Express as one of the Emerging Social Sector Leaders of 2015. Cutler is also a graduate of the American Express Leadership Academy. Arthur has been invited on several occasions by the US Department of State and Legacy International to join the US Delegation to travel to Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria and serve as an NGO expert and provide training, lectures and presentations for government officials, NGOs and academic institutions.

Cutler is also an adjunct professor at Michigan State University College of Law where he teaches courses in nonprofit law and tax-exempt organizations, focusing on the formation, governance, operation, and legal framework of non-profits and tax-exempt organizations.


Kresky-Wolff leaves a legacy of achievements at Open Arms, and will be profoundly missed by clients, staff, and supporters. Currently, Open Arms serves 84 chronically homeless women at the Dunbar, Owen House, and at individual scattered sites around the city. In addition, OAH case managers are assisting 23 women to find housing. Since 2009, when the Dunbar opened with 16 formerly homeless women, 94 percent of Open Arms’ clients have remained housed. This, and expanding the organization’s reach, is Kresky-Wolff’s greatest success.

Before working for Open Arms, Kresky-Wolff served as Deputy Project Director at the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration’s Homelessness Resource Center, and as a Senior Analyst for the Collaborative Initiative to Help End Chronic Homelessness. She was also a co-founder of Crossing Place, a Woodley House program in DC; the Director of Adult Homeless Mental Health Services at the Mental Health Association of Montgomery County, Maryland; Executive Director of of the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Baltimore; and, Chairperson of the Montgomery County, Maryland Coalition for the Homeless. Kresky-Wolff has a Masters in Social Work from Catholic University and a Masters in Public Health from Johns Hopkins.

The Board and staff at Open Arms honor Marilyn Kresky-Wolff for her commitment and compassion in helping DC’s most vulnerable citizens find safe, secure and permanent homes after living on the streets and in shelters. Her kindheartedness and her generosity of spirit will be truly missed at Open Arms, and she will be remembered for her fierce advocacy on behalf of the women she served. She is grateful for the support of the residents, staff and board of Open Arms, and of her family.